Client Support

The following list of clients includes those which have been tested and verified against the FTP environment to work with their specified protocol.

In several cases below, the terms "Linux" and "BSD" (two Unix variations) are used interchangeably; please consult the individual vendor's literature for the exact list of platforms supported. Likewise, "Windows" generally covers Microsoft's 32-bit operating systems from Windows 98 through Windows 7, but the exact list of supported operating systems should be obtained from the individual client vendor.

Note: ISD recommends the use of a FTP SSH client such as FileZilla, or a FTP SSL client from IPSwitch such as WS_FTP LE.
IPSwitch also offers two free, scriptable command-line clients, MOVEit Freely (FTP) and MOVEit Xfer (HTTPS) both of which support file integrity checking. Ipswitch also offers WS_FTP Professional, a Windows file transfer client with a robust feature set, which also supports file integrity checking.

Supported Web Browsers

iconinteg.gif (882 bytes) = Indicates this client ensures the integrity of transferred files and proves who uploaded and who downloaded a specific file (non-repudiation).

Use of the FTP Java Wizard on the Macintosh version of Firefox requires that you use the Java Preferences applet to select Java 1.5 (rather than 1.4.2).

Supported Secure FTP/SSL Clients

Supported Secure FTP/SSH (and SCP2) Clients

Note: Two of the clients above, (OpenSSH for Windows & SSH Communications), are capable of uploading files using multiple independent threads which may send blocks of data non-sequentially. This mode is not supported by FTP SSH and should be disabled using the "-R1" command-line option.

iconinteg.gif (882 bytes) = Indicates this client ensures the integrity of transferred files and proves who uploaded and who downloaded a specific file (non-repudiation).

Additional FTP over SSL Information:

The three modes of FTP over SSL are:

There are two advantages implicit mode enjoys over the other two modes due to its requirement to establish a secure channel before passing any commands at all. (The other two modes connect insecurely on TCP port 21, then build up a secure channel before passing sensitive information.)